Level 3 Courses

300 A Cultural and Intellectual History of Canada
This course is an historical analysis of Canadian literature, art, and architecture, and the intellectual forces that have shaped Canadian society. Cross-listed as ART 300. Six credits.

303 The Working Class in Early Canadian Society
This course considers the emergence and reconstitution of a working class in Canada between1800-1910. The course examines three spheres of working-class life: the conditions that gave rise to permanent wage-labour in industry; the changing nature of the working-class household, and; the social and cultural dimensions of working-class communities and the challenges posed by moral reformers and mass commercial culture. The course attempts to determine the extent of working-class identity that has emerged in Canada and how it has changed. Credit will be granted for only one of HIST 303 and HIST 309. Three credits.

304 The Working Class in Modern Canada
A continuation of HIST 303, this course considers the emergence and reconstitution of a working class in Canada between 1910-2010. The course attempts to determine the extent of working-class identity that has emerged in Canada and how it has changed into the contemporary era of the twenty-first century. Credit will be granted for only one of HIST 304 and HIST 309. Three credits.

314 Canada and the Cold War Era
Examines Canada’s response to the atomic/nuclear age and divisions between the two superpowers from 1945-1991. Students will learn how the Cold War affected Canada and the West through a study of selected themes: political and cultural dimensions of the Red Scare; Canadian diplomacy during the Cold War; Canada’s role in the Vietnam War, and participation in NATO and NORAD; the influence of the Cold War on gender, business, labour, and popular culture. Three credits.

317 Canadian Women’s and Gender History: From Colony to Nation
This course introduces students to major themes in the field of Canadian women’s and gender history. Covering the period from the late 16th century to the late 19th century, the course examines the historical development of women’s roles, experiences, identities and gender relations. Particular attention is given in this course to the impact of colonialism, and the intersection of gender, race, economic/class status, and Indigenous/non-Indigenous status in shaping women’s work, family roles, sexuality, political engagement and activism. Cross-listed as WMGS 317.  Credit will be granted for only one of HIST 317 and HIST 308. Three credits.

318 Canadian Women’s and Gender History: Modernity
This course introduces students to major themes in the field of Canadian women’s and gender history. Covering the period from the late 19th century to the late 20th century, the course examines the historical development of women’s roles, experiences, identities and gender relations. Particular attention is given to the intersection of gender, race, economic/class status, and Indigenous/non-Indigenous status in shaping women’s work, family roles, sexuality, political engagement and activism. Credit will be granted for only one of HIST 318 and HIST 308. Cross-listed as WMGS 318. Three credits.

319 Myth and Memory in Canadian History
The focus of this lecture and seminar course is not "What happened in the Canadian past?" but rather "How have individuals and groups remembered the past and who remembers and why?"  By examining a variety of communities, regions and time periods, students will look critically at how Canadians have used myth and memory to create their pasts and to construct individual and collective identities.  Three credits.

320 The USSR, 1917-1991
Examines the fall of the tsarist regime; the ideological roots of the Bolshevik Revolution; the economic, social, cultural, and political developments of the Soviet Union, from Lenin to Gorbachev; the failure of Soviet communism. Six credits. Not offered 2012-2013.

325 Eastern Europe, 1848-1995
Covers the Ottoman, Austro-Hungarian, Russian, and German empires; modernization and nationalism; World War I and the emergence of new states; World War II; the people’s democracies and the coming to power of the communists; the imposition of a Stalinist model of economic, cultural, political, and social development; the resistance to sovietization in Yugoslavia, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and Poland; the revolutions of 1989; the dismantlement of Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia. Six credits.

326 History of Cuba from Independence to the Revolution
This course examines Cuban history from the early 19th century to the present. This includes the late stage of Spanish colonialism and the slave economy based on sugar, coffee and tobacco; the struggle for abolition and national independence; the Spanish-American War of 1898 and U.S. domination in the 20th century; the 1933 revolution and armed struggle against the Batista dictatorship; Fidel Castro, Che Guevara and the socialist experiment; the Cold War and Cuba’s role in Latin America; and Cuban society in a post-Soviet world. The course will also address Afro-Cuban culture, gender and sexuality, and human rights. Prerequisite: HIST 255 or 256 recommended. Three credits.

332 The Medieval Body
This class explores late medieval conceptions of the physical body, which were always essential to identity in the Middle Ages. Medieval discussions of the practice of reading, clothing and fashion and even spiritual union with God, often involved debates and metaphors based upon the physical body. Through an exploration of primary and secondary texts along with seminar discussions, the class will explore the interconnectedness of late medieval ideas of corporeality, identity, spirituality and sexuality. Cross-listed as WMGS 333. Three credits.

333 The Individual in Medieval Society
Common scholarly discourse posits that individualism developed in the wake of the “civilizing process” of the early modern period and the 18th century Enlightenment. Yet many medieval scholars decry this chronology, citing examples of medieval people who seem to satisfy the requirements for modern individualism and exploring medieval theories of identity that permit the development of something like modern individualism. This course will explore and take part in this intense debate both by reading the scholarly literature on the subject and by reading primary sources that describe the experiences of medieval people. Prerequisite: HIST 231 or 232 recommended. Credit will be granted for only one of HIST 333 and HIST 330. Three credits.

334 Society and Ritual in the High Middle Ages
Like people living in the modern West, medieval individuals marked significant rites of passage such as birth, marriage and death with rituals. In the medieval West, these rituals usually revolved around the Catholic Church. This class will explore the major rites of passage through which medieval peasants, townspeople and nobles alike marked their lives, exploring not only the meaning and purpose of the rituals, but the rich social lives of those individuals participating in them. Prerequisite: HIST 231 or 232 recommended. Credit will be granted for only one of HIST 334 and HIST 330. Three credits.

337 History of Modern Mexico
This course examines the history of modern Mexico from independence to the present. This includes the independence war of 1810-1821; civil war, rebellion, and banditry in the 19th century; indigenous peoples’ struggles to preserve their culture in the 19th and 20th centuries; foreign intervention and Mexican relations with North America and Europe. Special attention is paid to the Mexican Revolution of 1910. The course follows developments in the post-revolutionary era to explore popular culture, gender and sexuality, modernization, democracy and social justice. Prerequisite: HIST 255 or 256 recommended. Three credits.

341 A History of Canadian-American Relations
A study of Canadian-American relations from the American Revolution to the modern era. Topics include the founding of separate American and provincial societies; the tensions of continental and nationalist identities; the evolution of a North American economy and culture; policy making and bilateral relations in NATO and the UN; post-9/11 security arrangements; complementary and conflicting national interests in political, military, economic, social, and cultural issues. Three credits.

343 The Place of Race in the United States
Explores the enduring importance of race in America, including identity formation; ‘identity politics;’ white-black and white-native interaction; slavery; abolition; Manifest Destiny; the Indian Wars; Reconstruction; Jim Crow segregation; xenophobia toward Asian immigrants; the migration of blacks to cities; the ghetto and de facto segregation; the Civil Rights Movement, Chicano rights movement, and American Indian Movement; the anti-affirmative action backlash. Prerequisite: HIST 242 and 244 recommended. Three credits.

346 American Social Movements, 1865-1945
Examines the triumphs and failures of social movements from the post-Civil War era to the New Deal, including grassroots organizations that nudged the US in a crucial new direction. Students will explore the nature of protest; disobedience and its effectiveness in the late 19th and 20th centuries; populism; women’s suffrage; radical pacifism; crafts-based and industrial unionism; and the unemployed peoples’ councils of the Great Depression. Prerequisite: HIST 242 and 244 recommended. Three credits.

347 American Social Movements, 1945-Present
Examines the triumphs and failures of social movements from the New Deal era to the present, including grassroots organizations that nudged the US in a crucial new direction. Students will explore the nature of protest; disobedience and its effectiveness in the mid to late 20th century; counter-movements against progressive actors; unionism; McCarthyism; civil rights; Black power; anti-nuclear activism; the anti-globalization movement. Prerequisite: HIST 242 and 244 recommended. Three credits.

351 United States Immigration and Ethnicity
Explores the history of immigration to the US and the role of ethnicity in American political, social, and cultural life. Topics will include immigrant conceptions of status and success; the effects of diasporic communities, migration, and return migration on the Old World; American acculturation, binationalism, and the persistence of ethnic identities, and agendas; stay-at-home mothers versus working women; the construction of immigrants’ ‘whiteness.’ Prerequisite: HIST 242 and 244 recommended. Three credits.

353 Explorers and Exploration before Columbus
Though tradition credits Christopher Columbus with beginning an age of exploration, Columbus himself knew that he drew from a long tradition of explorers who came before him including peoples as diverse as Islamic scholars, Venetian merchants, Basque fishermen and Viking sailors. He knew about the multicultural cities of Jerusalem and Karakorum where individuals from all over Eurasia traded knowledge and goods. This course will examine the science, technology, literature and history of exploration that so inspired Columbus and the extent to which the different cultures of the premodern world were interconnected by trade, pilgrimage and exploration. Prerequisites: HIST 231 and 232 recommended. Three credits.

355 The Sixties: A Social History
Examines the tumultuous 1960s and situates the Canadian experience within the international context - primarily the USA and Western Europe. Connections will be made between civil rights movements, anti-colonialism, environmentalism; “secondwave” feminism, Québécois nationalism, the New Left, student activism, and the importance of the counter-culture. The course will retain a historical perspective but draw upon interdisciplinary scholarship. The decade’s lasting significance and its current invocation as a cultural and political artefact will be debated. Three credits.

360 European Women’s History
This course examines major issues in the history of women in Europe from the pre-industrial era to the present. Themes to be covered include gender as a tool for historical analysis; the changing participation of women in the work force and in revolutionary and in reform movements; transformations in the domestic sphere; widening educational opportunities; and women in imperialism and global movements. Gender roles are dynamic and are the outcome of particular historical processes; students in this course will learn how historians untangle implications about a myriad and gendered identities based on the evidence of historical records. Cross-listed as WMGS 370. Three credits.

362 European Fascism
This course will explore the history of fascism from its late 19th century origins to the present day. Topics include the political and doctrinal origins of fascism and its crystallization during the Great War; the fascistization of politics, economy and society in Mussolini’s Italy and Hitler’s Germany; anti-Semitism; the appeal of fascism in interwar Europe; and its subsequent apogee during World War II and the Holocaust. Prerequisite: HIST 100 or 110 or permission of the instructor. Three credits.

363 Reformation Europe
Topics include the Catholic Church on the eve of the Reformation, Renaissance humanism, Martin Luther and Lutheranism, John Calvin and Calvinism, Henry VIII and Anglicanism, radical reformers, women and witchcraft, the Jesuits and the Council of Trent, the wars of religion within the Holy Roman German Empire and in France, Philip II and his Grand Project, the rivalry between Spain and England, the Thirty Years’ War (1618-48), and the historiography of the Reformation. Three credits.

364 The Holocaust
Explores the history and legacy of the destruction of the Jews in Europe during World War II. Topics include historical anti-Semitism; the rise of the Nazis; euthanasia; the ghettos; the death camps; the actions of collaborationist regimes; Jewish and non-Jewish resistance; the role of ordinary Germans; the establishment of Israel; and post-war trials and controversies. Three credits.

372 Imperial China
Topics include: Confucianism; the dynastic cycles; the fall of the Ming dynasty; the Manchus; the intrusion of the West: the missionaries, the Canton System, the opium wars and the unequal treaties; the Taiping Rebellion; the failed attempts at modernization; the Boxer uprising; the revolution of 1911. Credit will be granted for only one of HIST 370 and/or HIST 372 and 374. Three credits.

374 20th-Century China
Covers the revolution of 1911; warlordism; World War I and the May Fourth Movement; Sun Yatsen, Chiang Kaishek and the Guomindang; Mao Zedong and the Chinese Communisty Party; World War II (1937-45); the civil war (1945-49); the profound economic, social, cultural and political transformations of Communist China under Mao Zedong and Deng Xiaoping.  Credit will be granted for nly one of HIST 374, History 370 or HIST 372.  Three credits.

383 Victorian Britain
During the 19th century Britain simultaneously became the first fully industrialized, urbanized nation and experienced the transition to democracy. This course deals with the adjustments to these momentous changes during Britain’s greatest period of power. Three credits.

384 Britain in the 20th Century
Britain began the 20th century as a leading world power. By the end of the century this was much less the case, but the country had become one of the foremost welfare states. During this transformation, Britain faced important challenges in the two world wars, the ending of empire, and the Irish Question. This course deals with these and other challenges and the responses to them. Three credits.

386 Tudor England
Beginning with the foundation of Tudor rule in 1485, the course will explore the Reformation under Henry VIII and the statecraft of Elizabeth I. Students will explore the social, economic, political, religious, and diplomatic developments during this period. Three credits.

390 World War I
This course an in-depth study of the major aspects-social, cultural, economic, political, and military-of the Great War. Six credits.

394 Selected Topics
The topic for 2015-2016 is Canadian Social Policy in Historical Perspective. This
course explores the history of social welfare policy in Canada. Beginning with
charitable welfare provision in the late 19th century, it examines the political,
economic, and social contexts of the development of the 20th century welfare state.
Particular attention is given to understanding the making of social policy through
the lenses of gender, class, and race. This class considers what it has meant to
be a ‘social citizen’ in Canadian society. Three credits.

395 Selected Topics
The topic for 2015-2016 is American Civil Rights. This course will look at the
struggles of African Americans for racial justice in the U.S. through recent scholarly
literature and a rich record of documentary film. We will consider major events,
organizations, and figures that highlighted the most famous periods of “The
Movement” particularly between the 1930s and the 1960s. Three credits.

398 Themes in the History of Sexuality
A comparative study of the history of sexuality during the modern period from the eighteenth through the twentieth centuries. Following a broadly chronological and thematic approach to a diverse history of sexualities, the course will explore in particular the changing meanings of and interconnections between sexuality, race, class and gender. Topics will include: indigenous sexual cultures; sexuality and colonialism; inter-racial sexual relationships; the ‘invention of heterosexuality’; moral panics, prostitution, the regulation of sexual desire; and sexual subcultures. Cross-listed as WMGS 398. Three credits.